Musical instruments donations to schools

If you’re often writing or producing music alone, it can be really easy to lose perspective. Having a sounding board who is more experienced than you in a specific area can help you develop confidence in your artistic choices and build momentum for your musical journey. This is an essential part of your relationship with Soundfly and with your mentor — having someone in your corner who can help you develop the confidence to push yourself further than you thought you could go.

We cover a lot of musical topics between the editorial content here on Flypaper, our newsletter Soundfly Weekly, our mentored online courses, and our customized project-oriented mentorship sessions on Soundfly. Yet no matter what area of composition, production, performance, or business we’re talking about from one day to the next, we find that what links most modern musicians in their drive to learn more and expand their skills and opportunities today is the need to develop a better grasp on home recording.

Music grants 2019

One of Martin’s most memorable musical moments happened while working on the score to the indie film Experimenter, composed by Bryan Senti. During the recording session, Marty was asked to re-voice and notate a section that involved a lot of string harmonics — one of the toughest things to notate, given all the math of matching which note works with which harmonic and which finger hovers where. Marty dove in head first and got it done, despite biting his nails the entire time — and in the process learned not to be afraid to put it all on the line for the music.

Here we have a powerful, straight-talking music video that perfectly matches the mood of the song. The use of a static camera and extras singing with fast-moving shots communicates a widespread aggression that people often feel inside, but reveals a more powerful message when presented en masse. Limp Bizkit’s video calls upon the song as a release of aggression in a way that is strangely uniting, yet also super fun to watch.

Waterwheel foundation

Let’s face it: the music industry’s obsession with audiophile culture benefits big business more than anyone. 100 years ago, people’s minds would have been blown by a scratchy recording mechanically amplified through a gramophone. Today, we’ve been erroneously convinced that we need the best-of-the-best tech in order to truly connect with that music. At the end of the day, it’s just more money in the pockets of the 1%.

With an emphasis on preserving the land they work on, and using their facilities in a way that provides maximum benefit to the artist with the least impact on the environment, Djerassi is situated on a 583-acre ranch in Northern California’s Santa Cruz Mountains. Their programs are open to national and international mid-career level artists, and residencies are awarded at no cost, for a range of sessions lasting anywhere from four to five weeks long.