Best female rappers 2019

The lines to enter grocery stores are often hours long, and most are limiting purchases to ration supply. Queues for gas are absurd, and ATMs are frequently out of service. Water has been restored to Lalita’s area, but without electricity, it can’t reach apartments above the ground floor. Buying gallons for showering, toilet flushing, and drinking isn’t a reliable option — the island has mostly run out. Even individual bottles are extremely difficult to find.

John Entwistle almost didn’t make this list, by virtue of being, well, too good. There are so many great Who songs to choose from, but one melody that tends to stick in my head is the pentatonic major run heard behind the “I tip my hat” refrain in this song. The riff starts at the relative minor and runs down to the root, hitting all five notes of the scale. It’s a simple sequence, but I’ve noticed that scalar walk-downs to the root pretty much always sound good on the bass. (For example, check out the choruses of the Beatles’ “Helter Skelter” and Kiss’ “Shout It Out Loud”). Entwistle repeats this motif several times throughout the chorus with slight variations that keep it continually compelling.

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Touring is great. But it can very quickly turn into exhaustive, monotonous work. Here are 10 great tips to keep things interesting and fun on the road.

There’s an old studio saying: “Crap in, crap out.” No amount of mixing is going to save a bad vocal recording, so it’s important that you get it right at the source. Unfortunately, you probably don’t have much say over the recording process if you’re already at the point of mixing. But if you can get your hands on the raw tracks, you’ll be able to cherry-pick your favorite words or lines from each take and comp them together to create the ultimate Frankenstein-style performance.

Best rappers 2019

No classic song is safe from the cover treatment… but how many cover versions are actually interesting to listen to? We delve in and pick out our top 10.

Faders Up II is designed for producers with some hands-on mixing experience who are looking to expand their arsenal of skills and approaches, especially when it comes to working with a larger variety of artists and clients. You should be ready and excited to get your feet wet working on a set of audio tracks provided by the course (and that you bring in yourself).