Live at the Apollo, 1962 opens with Fats Gonder, the emcee of the evening, addressing the Harlem, New York crowd. He says, “So now, ladies and gentlemen, it is Star Time. Are you ready for Star Time?!” He then rattles off a list of Brown’s hits to further bolster the frontman’s larger-than-life persona. After a brief instrumental, the band launches into “I’ll Go Crazy,” which sets the tone for the evening. The band is inhumanly tight and every musician is an absolute slayer on their instrument. I’ll remind you that this was a Wednesday night.

Speaking of Timberlake, I didn’t watch the Super Bowl in 2004, but I remember kids at school telling me about it later. If you don’t know the story already, I’m here to fill you in.

Some musicians believe that if they make great music, everything else around their career will be taken care of; and this is a huge mistake. The truth is that no one should be more concerned about the non-musical aspects of your career than you. This means paying attention to things like song royalties, licensing agreements, and the details of every contract you sign. You don’t need to be a legal expert to be a musician, but having a passive attitude about the less flashy aspects of your music career can lead to devastating consequences.

Emerging curator grants

Mengyuan Xu is an electronic music artist from China who really leans into the musical aesthetic of traditional Chinese musical instrumentation. His heavy use of zithers and flutes gives his music a unique feel. I think it’s a really wonderful mix of old and new sounds to create something catchy and unique. A recent song of his, “Flame,” is more firmly rooted in the contemporary EDM pop sound, however it still has that Chinese opera influenced flavor that is undeniable.

The best and cheapest ones I’ve found are the Digitech RV-7 and the Electro Harmonix Cathedral. Both have reverse settings but the RV-7 is much smaller, in case you need to save space on your pedalboard! If you’re playing your favorite chords through this effect they will sound like psychedelic, dreamy synthesized strings, especially when you’re playing a guitar that has a whammy. First try it with your clean sound. Yum! And if you put it through a distortion pedal… BAM! Shoegaze!

Tapes, like vinyl, are analog, which means while you might not get that crackling sound you love so much about old vintage vinyls, you will get a uniquely analog sound that strikes up the warm and fuzzies. Plus, it actually will sound better than what you get from the compressed quality of streaming, so if you or your fans are audio heads in any way (or if you just value sound quality) this makes it a really good option.

We took inspiration from the concept of crowdfunding indeed. We realized that, in many ways, the best way to help artists fund their projects was to call out their community. Today, fans like to get involved in the music they love, and they want to actively support artists. Musical projects count for 10 to 20% of all crowdfunding projects in France. In the United States, 20% of the Kickstarter projects that reach their objective are musical projects.

In this edition of “Talking Points,” producer and beat maker Kaytranada talks about his grooves, his influences, and his upbringing, and we boil it down!

Grants for performing arts organizations

Let’s start out with what a narrative is not. Your narrative is not necessarily the same thing as your biography. It is not a list of facts about your music education, when your band formed, and what awards you’ve received. And it’s not something that just lives on the bio page of your website.

There are many different approaches to creating a memorable music video concept. The sky is truly the limit when it comes to thinking up of creative ways to carry forward your band’s musical message, visually (and you don’t need a big budget, either).

Sometimes you can find unexpected new meanings by recontextualizing vocals, like when I discovered that Whitney Houston singing the words “I know” from her a cappella to “How Will I Know” sounds great over De La Soul’s “Eye Know.” (Email me if you’re dying to hear this experiment.)

Soundfly course producer John Hull walks us through how he creates a Slice to MIDI preset in Ableton Live so you can build your own customized version.

Repetitive dance forms went out of style in the Romantic era, and while they made a comeback in the 20th century, it wasn’t exactly in a predictable, listener-friendly context. Ross says, “But it’s really in jazz, blues, and rock ‘n’ roll where the lamento bass has a surprising revival.”